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Hayashida Shrine Ruins

Hayashida Shrine Ruins
 
On the sandō of Hayashida Shrine, between the first torii gate and the main hall, lies a second torii gate and stone lanterns.
Asset Classification: Historic Building
Address: Ln. 41, Fuxing Rd., ,Fenglin To,Hualien Co
Announcement date: 2021/09/23
GPS Coordinates: 121.46622,23.74866
Competent Authority: Hualien County

指定/登錄理由

Features

Hayashida Shrine was located within an immigrant village. In the 3rd year of the Taishō era (Japanese colonial period; 1914 CE), the Japanese government established the government-run Hayashida Immigrant Village in Hualien, welcoming Japanese immigrants to settle in the area. To relieve the immigrants from any unease they could feel in a strange land, a Buddhist mission and a Shinto shrine were built in the village. Hayashida Shrine marked the beginning of religious practices by Japanese immigrants in Taiwan. Construction of the shrine was completed in the 4th year of the Taishō era (1915 CE), with the inauguration ceremony held on June 6th. The shrine was dedicated to the Kaitaku Sanjin (Three Kami Deities of Cultivation) and Prince Kitashirakawa Yoshihisa, symbolizing blessing over Japan's management of its new territory. The shrine's annual festival was held on October 6th. On the sandō (pathway leading to a Shinto shrine or a Buddhist temple) of Hayashida Shrine, between the first torii gate and the main hall, lies a second torii gate and stone lanterns. The torii gates are built in the shinmei-zukuri style, while the stone lanterns belong to the kasuga style. The main hall of the shrine sat on a three-tiered foundation. The shrine's foundation and tamagaki (surrounding fence)—which have been preserved since the Japanese colonial period—are especially precious, as everything else fell to the cruel hands of time.

發展源流

主要特色


The main building of the main hall has been destroyed, only part of the wall remains
The main building of the main hall has been destroyed, only part of the wall remains
The stairs leading to the main hall, the above building no longer exists, but the shrine base is still intact and has preservation value
The stairs leading to the main hall, the above building no longer exists, but the shrine base is still intact and has preservation value
The remains of the pillar base of the main building of the main hall, which is waterproof and moisture-proof and decorative
The remains of the pillar base of the main building of the main hall, which is waterproof and moisture-proof and decorative
The base of the main hall is divided into three layers, the first and second bases are all made of pebbles. The first floor foundation is surrounded by cement square pillars arranged into guardrails, and each cement pillar is written with the name of the recipient; the second floor foundation is an intermediary space; the third floor foundation is made of cement, and the main building of the main hall above the cement
The base of the main hall is divided into three layers, the first and second bases are all made of pebbles. The first floor foundation is surrounded by cement square pillars arranged into guardrails, and each cement pillar is written with the name of the recipient; the second floor foundation is an intermediary space; the third floor foundation is made of cement, and the main building of the main hall above the cement
The base of the shrine’s main shrine and Tamaki are intact
The base of the shrine’s main shrine and Tamaki are intact
The torii of Hayashida Shrine belongs to the torii of the gods. It consists of two upright
The torii of Hayashida Shrine belongs to the torii of the gods. It consists of two upright "pillars" and two transverse members on the top of the pillars.
The stone lanterns of the Japanese era were destroyed after the war, and the components were scattered or lost. They were rebuilt in the year 103 of the Republic of China (2014), and their shapes are different from those of the Japanese era.
The stone lanterns of the Japanese era were destroyed after the war, and the components were scattered or lost. They were rebuilt in the year 103 of the Republic of China (2014), and their shapes are different from those of the Japanese era.
Stone lantern components from the Japanese era, the picture shows the
Stone lantern components from the Japanese era, the picture shows the "fire pouch"
The remains of Japanese shrines scattered in the hinterland of Lintian Shrine
The remains of Japanese shrines scattered in the hinterland of Lintian Shrine

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