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Haishan Shrine Ruins

Haishan Shrine Ruins
 
Stairway to the walkway left at Haishan Shrine Ruins.
Asset Classification: Monument
Address: Ln. 455, Yuanshan Rd.,Zhonghe Di,New Taipei
Announcement date: 2021/09/13
GPS Coordinates: 121.47890,25.00478
Competent Authority: New Taipei City

指定/登錄理由

Features

Built in 1938, Haishan Shrine faces north towards today's Zhongshan Road in Zhonghe District, New Taipei City. During the era of Japanese rule, Zhongshan Road was the main route between Banqiao Town and Zhonghe Village (today's Zhonghe and Yonghe Districts), the largest village in Haishan County (today's Banqiao, Tucheng, Sanxia, Yingge, Shulin, Zhonghe, and Yonghe Districts). Haishan Shrine is situated in the uplands between Banqiao and Zhonghe, overlooking the two largest settlements in Haishan County. Back then, the Japanese government pushed the Japanization movement, hoping to strengthen its rule through faith with its "one shrine for each village" policy. Haishan Shrine is dedicated to Emperor Meiji (1867-1912), Ōkuninushi (one of the three central deities in Japanese mythology), and Prince Kitashirakawa Yoshihisa (1847-1895 CE), who perished during the Japanese invasion of Taiwan. At the time, the shrine was the site of celebrations after harvest each fall, where the Police Regiment (formerly known as zhuangdingtuan, a local police institution) would parade the streets carrying divine sedan chairs. Haishan County's administrative center would also organize performances like wrestling, kendo, and dancing. After World War II, Japanese shrines were forcibly demolished by the Kuomintang government. Haishan Shrine was among those demolished, and so could not be properly preserved.

發展源流

主要特色


Gravel trails around the original site of Haishan Shrine Ruins
Gravel trails around the original site of Haishan Shrine Ruins
The accumulation pond of Yuanshan Park, located next to the ruins, was expanded in Republic of China 47 (1958) with US aid funds.
The accumulation pond of Yuanshan Park, located next to the ruins, was expanded in Republic of China 47 (1958) with US aid funds.
Haishan Shrine Ruins—The air-raid shelter was built during the Showa period so far.
Haishan Shrine Ruins—The air-raid shelter was built during the Showa period so far.
The surrounding landscape of the air-raid shelter
The surrounding landscape of the air-raid shelter
The left pillar of the third torii base of Haishan Shrine Ruins. Torii is a gate-shaped object located at the entrance of a shrine. According to Shinto legends, it can connect the divine realm with the secular world.
The left pillar of the third torii base of Haishan Shrine Ruins. Torii is a gate-shaped object located at the entrance of a shrine. According to Shinto legends, it can connect the divine realm with the secular world.
Haishan Shrine Ruins Ishigaki
Haishan Shrine Ruins Ishigaki
Remnant Platform of Haishan Shrine Ruins
Remnant Platform of Haishan Shrine Ruins
The third torii pillar base (the base of the gatepost), one of the Haishan Shrine Ruins, the right pillar base in the picture.
The third torii pillar base (the base of the gatepost), one of the Haishan Shrine Ruins, the right pillar base in the picture.
Front view of Haishan Shrine Ruins
Front view of Haishan Shrine Ruins

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